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A Comparison of Beowulf and the Seafarer

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Text Preview Beowulf and The Seafarer In a comparison between “Beowulf” and “The Seafarer” one finds two contrasting beliefs in fate and the sea from the story’s main characters. Beowulf is resigned to fate and is humble before the force of the sea, while The Seafarer is fearful of the powers of fate and the sea and is unwilling to accept them.

Though the actions and thoughts of Beowulf give him a god-like appearance in the story he believes that God and fate work together. He boasts of his encounters with devilish sea creatures saying, “I treated them politely,/ Offering the edge of my razor-sharp sword.” This strong statement reveals Beowulf’s divine and invulnerable self-confidence. To Beowulf, “Fate saves/ The living when they drive away death by themselves.” Beowulf is compelled to observe fate but does not feel it should completely rule him. He allows fate to direct his life, but not govern his actions. A display of Beowulf’s belief in fate is evident when he says, “Fate will unwind as it must.” Meaning, there is a master plan to the world with which he must live. When Unferth taunts him, Beowulf replies by questioning Unferth’s manhood and makes a fool of him in front of everyone. Boasting, “Neither he nor you can match me.” Though he tests fate, he has a more fearful respect for the sea. He knows its power from his race with Brecca. The seas were dark and harsh, but he remained humble and ventured through the murky waters because of this respect.

As a contrast to Beowulf’s beliefs, the Seafarer feels that fate destroys all and takes everything away. Fate is an all mighty power to him and no man can control it, no matter what he does. “”Fate is stronger/ And God mightier than any man’s mind.” This shows the Seafarers fearful surrender to these unearthly powers. “Wondering what fate has willed and will do.” Yet with all this fear and sorrow he does not accept it, but rather wills it away. He is afraid of its power and ability to be stronger than... Show More

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